The Inbetweeners Movie (2011)

Comedy
James Buckley, Blake Harrison, Joe Thomas, Simon Bird
Four socially troubled 18-year-olds from the south of England go on holiday to Malia.
It arguably plays most strongly to fans of the BBC series, but even viewers who have never seen The Inbetweeners on TV may find themselves won over by the film's surprisingly tender ribaldry.
  • Wrekin Hill Entertainment Company:
  • R Rated:
  • IMDB link IMDB:
  • 17 Aug 2011 Released:
  • 12 Dec 2011 DVD Release:
  • $36.0k Box office:

All subtitles:



Trailer:

Carefree fun8/10
Most people probably know what they are going to get before entering the cinema. So sniffy pseudo intellectuals should probably stay clear. But if you're the sort of person who liked the TV series, doesn't think they are a "chav" by eating McDonalds and likes fart jokes then you will really enjoy this movie. The whole audience laughed out loud on many occasions. No its not a clever plot, but they do manage to purvey a slice in time where we are all making the mistakes we all do as we move from adolescence into adulthood. The primary characters maintain their chemistry (which must only come with having now spent so much time with each other). You don't eat a cheese sandwich expecting a Michelin star, and so it is when watching this movie. Its silly, funny, cringe worthy humour. I really enjoyed it, and I imagine a good many others will too.
'I saw The Inbetweeners last night, it was great.' 'I'm sorry, the what?'8/10
Despite this British sitcom's surprisingly far-reaching fan base (not a single seat of the four hundred in my cinema was left unoccupied) I still find myself having to explain the show to family members, casual acquaintances and my favourite movie-loving cab driver on the way home.

So, a quick recap. The premise is simple: we follow four friends on the fringe of social status, somewhere between the 'normal kids' and the 'freaks', as they meander their way through high school and its teenage perils. There's the nerdy but level-headed narrator Will (Simon Bird), selfish relationship-dependent Simon (Joe Thomas), compulsive liar and big-noter Jay (James Buckley) and lovable dimwit Neil (Blake Harrison). The film picks up, naturally, during the last day of school. The boys decide to book a party holiday to Greece to help Simon get over his break-up with Carli, but things get hairy when Simon, who is at the furthest point from being over his ex, spots her on the same trip.

If I had to justify why I loved this film with one sentence, it would be this: at no point does it stray from the formula that made the show so refreshing. The humour is there, as are the scenes of incredible social awkwardness, but this consistency begins with proper characterisation. Every fan of the show has a personal favourite, and should be pleased to hear that their move to the big screen has not coerced creators Beesley and Morris into thinking they should customise the characters to suit a wider audience. By the end of the film, each of the four is in an inherently better position in their life than they were two hours ago, but how they all get there remains entrenched in typical Inbetweeners fashion.

What does this mean exactly? It means that the screenplay puts individual character development on the backburner for most of the film, instead preferring to fill every scene with a truckload of jokes ranging from slapstick, the spoken word and a merciless array of cringe-worthy moments; the kind that have become the niche of the series. In any other genre this could be considered a sour point, but comedies are granted exceptions on the basis that they exist primarily to entertain, not to provide a moral, or indeed, much deep thinking at all. Does each character learn something about their life through their experience in Greece? Sure. Should we expect them to let the rest of their life be guided by these same profound moments of clarity? I doubt it.

Anyone even slightly familiar with the series would be aware of its unrelentingly crude subject matter, which some might interpret as vulgar or even offensive. That's a personal call, and while it doesn't concern my comedic sensibilities in the slightest, I must warn the more politically correct among us that this is not a movie for you. Few social taboos are left undisturbed, and when you couple this with the notion that filmmakers can get away with a lot more on the big screen (a saying that rings especially true for The Inbetweeners), it is recommended that fence-sitters have a long think about how they feel about the series, lest they return home with the unexplained compulsion to take a boiling hot bath and scrub until a little skin comes off.

If I had to make a couple of minor criticisms, I would say that a handful of party cliches are overdone (see: front-on shots of friends walking in slow- motion through a club with big grins on their faces) and that some realism is lost when Simon appears too gullible to be believed (you'll know it when you see it). However, these moments are few and far between, and fail to detract from making this the funniest movie I've seen in a good few years.

*There's nothing I love more than a bit of feedback, good or bad. So drop me a line on jnatsis@iprimus.com.au and let me know what you thought of my review.*
Loved the series, but this really wasn't very good.5/10
Don't get me wrong - I loved The Inbetweeners series, which packed a freshness and sparkle that far outshone many of the pallid comedic offerings of the late noughties. In all accounts, sadly, I feel the film failed to capture the magic of the show.

The movie plot positively throbs with potential - horny teens, a chavvy holiday destination, a pot of money from a dead grandparent. What could go wrong? Sadly the characters proved utterly skin-deep, the jokes were sparse and predictable, and the finale an embarrassment with the characters' half-baked romances.

The television series were a warm and funny reflection on the trials of Brit adolescence. This film provides a few banal little holiday vignettes and a poo joke. Disappointing.
Does what it says on the tin10/10
This is the first review of ever been compelled to write - it's a direct result of having read some reviews in the media slating this film for not 'moving on the characters' etc...

As a huge fan of the TV series I was very nervous about how this film would go prior to it's release I told people 'I hope it's not the usual feature film formula - they go away, have fun, fall out, and reconcile for the final party' - I must say, and it won't spoil the film for anyone when I do, that's exactly what happens....but done with such brilliance no one will mind.

As has been stated by other reviewers the film is no more than an extended episode of the TV show - but when you 4 such perfect characters that is exactly how it should be. The cinema I watched it in was packed (with people of both genders and all ages) and in stitches from start to finish. The film, like the series, is so close to the truth regarding being 17/18 and the rubbish you get up to that you can't help but be dragged into the world of Neil, Jay, Simon and Will.

A wonderful ending to a wonderful series - the world is a sadder place without this comedy and, more importantly, these four characters.
The Inbetweeners Movies Is The Funniest Film Of Year By A Clear Mile9/10
If you are like me and you love the inbetweeners television show, then the movie will have been much anticipated. I am pleased to report that the movie is not a disappointment. Will, Simon, Jay and Neil are all together as the group head out to Malia for a lads holiday after leaving school. It is meant to be the holiday of a life time, but in classic inbetweeners style not everything goes to plan.

The film is meant to be a fair well to the guys after three very successful TV series and the lads go out in style. The opening of the film sees Simon being dumped by Carli, which gives Jay the idea that the group should leave their troubles behind and have a holiday full of drink, girls and many other things. The holiday shows the boys at the highest of highs and the lowest of lows, but in the end having the time of their lives.

These characters have made me laugh for the past couple of years on television and I was sad to hear that the third series would be the last. However I was pleasantly surprised when I heard about the movie being made. It would be a final send off to four of the funniest faces on TV. The film (just like the show) gives each character their own problems and triumphs as the film goes on and as we expect, some very embarrassing moments. The film is very funny and has numerous laugh out loud moments, but the great thing is the spirit of the film. It has a good heart and a script that gives the characters we care about fitting conclusions.

The credit has to be given to the writers Ian Morris and Damon Beesley who wrote the show as well. This is more then just a spin off from the show, it is a uplifting tale for the four boys full of plenty of laughs. I hope the film receives praise from the critics as it is more then just the comedy of the year, but in my mind one of the best films of the year.

Never disappointed or bored at any point in the film, the inbetweeners movie is a wonderful tale of coming of age. You will be pushed to find a more entertaining and funny film all year. I loved it!