Happythankyoumoreplease (2010)

Comedy, Drama, Romance
Josh Radnor, Malin Akerman, Zoe Kazan, Michael Algieri
Captures a generational moment - young people on the cusp of truly growing up, tiring of their reflexive cynicism, each in their own ways struggling to connect and define what it means to love and be loved.
  • Hannover House Company:
  • R Rated:
  • IMDB link IMDB:
  • 03 Mar 2011 Released:
  • 21 Jun 2011 DVD Release:
  • $0.2M Box office:

All subtitles:



Trailer:

I'm so sad that people will spoil this for other people7/10
I watched this without a clue what it was about. But soon after it started, I found myself wondering with bated breath what would happen next, and next, and next, and next. The dialogue was as fresh and colorful as the cast. The direction was steered by a steady hand that knew when to back off and when to tone things down, when to intensify, and how close and to and at what angle the camera should be to the actors. The direction never condescends to its audience as the direction of most romantic comedies do. Nor does this movie smother us with too much wit or too much symbolism. The movie was practically perfect in that it balanced what I think we ask of our comedic dramas: a fresh look at love and humor, believability, and poignancy. It felt so richly human that when it was over I felt that I had watched a new hot play instead of a movie, that's how vivid it was, that's how roughly hewn and real it was.

For those who desperately need some kind of plot-frame before seeing it, I'll give you a jumping off point. It starts with a New York late 20s/early 30s struggling novelist who decides to help a lost boy find his way back home.
Incredible Debut for Josh Radnor9/10
I caught the premiere of Happy at the Sundance Film Festival. I'm a huge fan of Josh Radnor (best known for his role as Ted Mosby on the CBS series, How I Met Your Mother), but remained a little skeptical going in since this is a first-time film for him. I was pleasantly surprised! This movie is so charming; I couldn't help falling in love with all of the characters. I was especially impressed by Tony Hale's endearing performance as Sam #2, who tries to win the affection of Annie (Malin Akerman), a woman with Alopecia who struggles with the idea of someone being so smitten with her. Mary Catherine (Zoe Kazan) and Charlie (Pablo Schreiber) are absolutely adorable together and have an unbeatable on screen chemistry. They are at a crossroads in their relationship as Charlie tries to sell Mary Catherine on the idea of leaving their home in New York to move to L.A.

Sam (Josh Radnor), Mississippi (Kate Mara) and Rasheen (Michael Algieri) round out the cast of characters. Mississippi is a cabaret singer who catches the eye of Sam early in the film and while their hesitation to throw caution to the wind and go for each other is annoying at times, it brings a much-needed realism over romance approach to their relationship.

Rasheen was an audience favorite and his role adds a unique piece to this puzzle, playing a foster boy separated from his family on the subway who is rescued and looked after by Sam. It is truly an enjoyable highlight of the film to watch their interactions as they grow from perfect strangers to close friends. An amazing dynamic is brought to the script through their friendship, but not without Rasheen's life before Sam looming in the distance.

If this movie is any indication of Josh's talent as a writer, I can't wait to see more of his work. It contains all of the elements of a romantic comedy, yet manages to completely avoid the cliches and predictability that are typically found in this genre. It is clever, heartwarming, hopeful and hilarious. I wouldn't be surprised if it becomes the big hit of Sundance 2010. Congratulations to Josh and everyone behind this film!
Charming debut for Josh Radnor9/10
I adored this film, it was one of my favorites at Sundance, and the
cast & crew were amazingly sweet people.

The film is a trio of intertwined stories involving six New Yorkers
dealing with the complexities of love, friendship and identity. While
this premise may sound familiar, its charm is refreshing and its
character keeps the film from becoming just another romantic comedy.

The main story focuses on Sam Wexler, a struggling writer (Radnor ),
who, during a particularly bad day when he encounters a young boy
(played by the adorable Michael Algieri) who's been separated from his
family. When the boy reveals that he is unhappy in foster care, Sam
decides to bring the boy back to his apartment, and a unique friendship
begins to develop between the two. This friendship both initiates and
complicates Sam's romance with a beautiful cabaret singer named
Mississippi (Kate Mara).

I really recommend this film. I can't wait for it to be released in
theaters so my friends and family can see it.
6 New Yorkers in their late 20's/early 30's change and grow.10/10
This is an excellent "slice of life" movie, very easy to relate to and entertaining. It manages to be optimistic without being saccharine sweet. The writer/director, while male, depicts women characters with compassion and understanding. And New York in summer feels like the real thing, in a way that the best Woody Allen films do. Most impressive and enjoyable, though, are the performances. Malin Ackerman has never been better. Tony Hale is a revelation! Josh is excellent (and nothing like Ted Mosby). The little boy, Michael Algieri, is a natural. And Kate Mara -- omg! Not only is she gorgeous, funny and engaging, she's an amazing singer!! Watching her one feels a star being born. The songs by Jaymay -- which are the movie's score -- are perfect. And tech credits (cinematography, editing, production design) are fantastic.
I wanted to like it, but it was clichéd3/10
As someone who enjoys shameless chick flicks and Josh Radnor, but is also a Sundance enthusiast, I really wanted to like this film. The storyline was fine, the music by Jaymay was awesome, the actors are all decent.

That being said, it was totally apparent that Radnor is still an amateur at writing and directing. You know how, in high school, when your friend asked you to read their angsty poetry, and it took all of you not to roll your eyes? That's what watching this movie was kind of like.

There was so much contrived drama that it would have been better suited to a soap opera or comedy. Instead, the actors had to take a superficially dramatic script and try to wring some drama out of it. For instance, the movie starts off with a one-night-stand leaving Radnor's apartment just as he wakes up and realizes he is late for an interview. Conveniently, his best friend leaves a voicemail as he's getting ready, as if she would know he were there listening, perfectly timed to tell him to tuck his shirt in right as he finishes dressing. But it's not a comedy! It's just trying to be clever. He ends up speaking with her on the phone and says something like, "Why did I oversleep? Why am I so afraid of success?" This sounds exactly like what some screen writing student would think that a self-pitying artist would say. The rest of the movie moves conveniently along these lines: things a screen writing student THINKS his characters would say. Unfortunately, film enthusiasts will be unsurprised by every line fed to them from here on out.

Rasheen's character was great and would have made this a promising movie if only his presence in the plot was not based on some ridiculous presence.

I'm curious to see what Radnor will do next, but he'd probably be wise to work on short films and practice the art of delighting the audience in as little time as possible before attempting a longer format again.