The Fury (1978)

Drama, Horror, Sci-Fi, Thriller
Kirk Douglas, John Cassavetes, Carrie Snodgress, Charles Durning
A government agent is determined to come to his son's rescue, when a sinister official kidnaps him to harbor his extremely powerful psychic abilities.
  • 10 Mar 1978 Released:
  • 04 Sep 2001 DVD Release:
  • N/A Box office:
  • John Farris, John Farris Writer:
  • Brian De Palma Director:
  • N/A Website:

All subtitles:



Trailer:

Explosive thriller is perhaps De Palma's most underrated work!10/10
After the success of Carrie (1976), Brian De Palma followed up with another outstanding film about youths with incredible telepathic powers.

Government agent's telepathic son is kidnapped and along with a similarly-gifted teenage girl he seeks to save him.

Based upon the novel by John Farris, The Fury is a film that could have easily became a mundane action film if not for the splendid direction of De Palma and an outstanding cast. De Palma once again shows his excellent directorial style and his technique for grand suspense. The Fury has some great action sequences, a tremendous climax, and one outrageous conclusion! Makeup FX artist Rick Baker lends his talents to create some good blood-letting, especially for that knock-out closing image. John Williams also deserves special mention for his wonderfully powerful music score.

Star Kirk Douglas is great as the government agent searching for his son. John Cassavetes is good as the films cold villain. Amy Irving and Andrew Stevens are both sympathetic as youths attempting to live with their amazing mental powers. Supporting cast Snodgress, Durning, and Lewis are also good.

All around The Fury is a pretty under appreciated thriller that firmly ranks among the best of De Palma's films.

*** 1/2 out of ****
Powerful, bloody tale of telekinetic rivalry with a stunning John Williams score8/10
The author of the excellent 'All Heads Turn As The Hunt Goes By', John Farris, wrote his version of 'Carrie' after that novel's success as book and film; it was called 'The Fury'. It also explored the subject of telekinesis (moving objects with the mind), but he stretched it over a broader, international canvas and threw a terrorism subplot, a fractured love story, an Argento-inspired school for cute, gifted girls, telekinetic rivalry, and John Cassavetes as an evil puppetmaster of troubled psychic warriors into the brew. Assisted immeasurably by John William's devastating, baroque score, Brian De Palma's film of Farris's screenplay is another example of stunning visual storytelling. Losing the direct Hitchcockian references, De Palma applies a harder, leaner style to the storytelling and creates a powerful work that is less fun than his later films, but no less compelling. As always, there are a number of stand-out sequences, and the stand-out sequence in this is Amy Irving's escape from the institute where she is being groomed for "evil" by the charming but twisted Cassavetes. Irving's flight into the street, shot in slow motion, is cinema at its purest, most transporting and erotic (Irving is wearing a nightie). William's scoring of this sequence is stunning. A carousel accident, orchestrated by "evil" psychic Andrew Stevens (in a chilling performance), has great entertainment value, and the liberal use of blood and bulging prosthetic facial veins goes a long way towards elevating this film to cult status. The finale, which features an exploding head (a pre-"Scanners" exploding head, mind you) is simply bloody great.
One of De Palma's most underrated movies!5/10

'The Fury' is a very interesting mixture of science fiction, horror, action, and espionage thriller. One of Brian De Palma's most underrated movies, it isn't without some flaws, but overall I enjoyed it much more than some of his most recent disappointing efforts like 'Snake Eyes' and 'Mission To Mars'. They might be much better known than 'The Fury' but they are not better movies. The plot is a bit convoluted at times, and maybe a little TOO ambitious, but there are several classic sequences that make this a must see for any De Palma fan. The whole thing comes across like a cross between 'Carrie' (De Palma's previous movie), and Cronenberg's 'Scanners', a movie it predated by three years, interestingly enough. Amy Irving, who also appeared in 'Carrie', is beautiful and believable as Gillian, a troubled teen attempting to understand and control her frightening paranormal powers. Veteran Kirk Douglas ('Spartacus', 'Saturn 3') and cult director/actor John Cassavetes ('Rosemary's Baby', 'The Killers') are both solid as friends-turned-enemies who once worked for the same nameless Government agency. Douglas' psychic son Robin (Andrew Stevens) is kidnapped by Cassavetes and his cronies and experimented on until he reaches the brink of madness. Douglas desperately searches for him by any means necessary, a quest which inevitably means he encounters the traumatized Gillian, who has an increasing psychic link with Robin. Irving and Douglas are both excellent in this movie, Cassavetes plays a fantastic villain, and the supporting cast includes Carrie Snodgress ('Diary Of A Mad Housewife'), Charles Durning ('O Brother, Where Art Thou?'), Fiona Lewis ('Drum'), and cameos from Daryl Hannah ('Bladerunner'), De Palma semi-regular William Finley ('The Phantom Of The Paradise') and a noticeably younger and thinner Dennis Franz (NYPD Blue'). While I couldn't argue that 'The Fury' is De Palma's best work it has aged very well indeed and is recommended viewing. This is one movie that deserves to be re-evaluated!
It's enjoyable enough, even with its faults.7/10
Peter Sandza (Kirk Douglas) a government agent is betrayed by a fellow friend/agent Ben Childress (John Cassavetes), who kidnapped his son for his psychokinetic powers. Where we learn that a secret US agency is holding him and that he's being used in dangerous mind experiments. So Peter gets help from a girl with similar abilities to locate his son's whereabouts.

I wasn't expecting too much from it after borrowing it off a friend that recommended it to me. After seeing it, it's probably De Palma's most underrated film in my books. It might not have dated that well and the premise of the film might be considered ludicrous now, but it doesn't stop it from being an exciting adventure.

This is a flashy and mostly fast-paced thriller by director Brian De Palma. It does have a couple of slow moments and maybe it was a tad too long, but it's well compensated by superbly tense situations and blistering action sequences, especially in the first opening hour involving Douglas's character when his son is kidnapped and when his hiding out from government agents. There are also some scenes that are not recommended for the squeamish. As some scenes are filled with a lot of blood and more blood. It's rather graphic violence. Not to forgot the whooping and hearting-pounding conclusion. The make-up and special effects throughout the film are truly stunning.

The plot basis is on psychokinetic powers and at times it's rather absurd and incoherent. With some incredibly cheesy moments within the dialogue. Though, the direction is what covers the story's inconsistencies, with great and simply memorable set-ups and some well-shot scenes. The music score is fairly effective in building up the tension and thrills, but also it has an impact in the quieter moments.

There are great performances from the experienced Kirk Douglas (who's incredibly fit for his age and has some physical roles) and Cassavetes, who really boost and add some class to the film. There is such a great chemistry between them and Cassavetes is simply riveting as a conniving agent. Amy Irving was good in her role as Gillian Bellaver, the girl who is having trouble coming to grips with her strong psychokinetic powers. Though, the same can't be said about the rest. As Andrew Steven's as Robin Sandza is incredibly hammy and Carrie Snodgress as Hester is fairly irritating.

I wouldn't class it as one of De Palma's best, but still it's far away from his worst. Overall, it's a fascinating set-up that has its fair share of flaws, but that doesn't disrupt entertainment factor.
DePalmas followup to "Carrie"5/10
Story involves two teenagers--Gillian (Amy Irving) and Robin (Andrew Stevens). They both have the power to make people bleed and see past events. Robin is kidnapped by a secret government agency and Gillian is going to the Paragon Institute to learn more about her "power". There's a LOT more going on but it's too confusing to get into.

When I saw this on video back in the 1980s I loved it. Seeing it now I hate it. The story is very confusing with way too many characters and plot holes galore. The dialogue is terrible (I kept playing back scenes on the DVD because I couldn't believe what I had just heard) and this moves VERY slowly (it runs two solid hours).

The acting doesn't help. Irving is too weepy and whiny (but she IS great in the final scene). Stevens has never been a good actor. Douglas walks through his role and John Cassavates (playing the bad guy) gives a one-note performance. The only good acting comes from Carrie Snodgrass, Charles Durning, Carol Eve Rossen and (especially) Fiona Lewis.

It has some good things--the direction from Brian DePalma is excellent (especially Irving's slow motion run from the Institute) and there's a good score by John Williams. Also it does have a few incredibly bloody deaths. These were considered extreme back in 1978 but they aren't anymore (and look incredibly fake). There's also a great final scene and I got a good laugh over the incredibly dated video games Snodgrass and Irving play at one point. Also Daryl Hannah's first film.

So it DOES have some good things but the slow pace, confusing story and lousy dialogue sinks it. I can only give it a 5.