And Now for Something Completely Different (1971)

Comedy
John Cleese, Michael Palin, Graham Chapman, Terry Gilliam
An anthology of Monty Python's best sketches from their 1st & 2nd seasons of their original TV show.
  • Sony Pictures Company:
  • PG Rated:
  • IMDB link IMDB:
  • 22 Aug 1972 Released:
  • 03 Aug 1999 DVD Release:
  • N/A Box office:
  • Graham Chapman, John Cleese Writer:
  • Ian MacNaughton Director:
  • N/A Website:

All subtitles:



supremely silly skits5/10

Monty Python used this collection of sketches from their first and second TV series (re-packaged and staged again) to break into the American market. A gamble, but a successful one.

All the greats are here – Parrot Sketch, Dirty Fork, Hell's Grannies, Fresh Fruit Self Defence, Marriage Guidance – and more besides. The animated links, specially created for the movie, are funny and well put-together: and new versions of Killer Cars and the story of the Spot are excellent. In many cases the film versions of the sketches outshine those in the TV series and are more memorable, particularly those which first appeared in series 1.

This is a very good introduction to the team and a strong reminder of their early work for the BBC.
Pure Python Madness9/10

"And Now For Something Completely Different" is a showcase of the kind of comedy that defines Monty Python's Flying Circus. The BBC comedy classic has a huge following worldwide, owing to its unique use of surreal humor. This movie is a collection of some of the Pythons' best from their first two seasons, including classics like "The Lumberjack Song" and "The Dead Parrot Sketch." One of the best factors of "Monty Python" was the eye-catching animations of Terry Gilliam. This movie is rich with his art, which includes the wacky B-movie spoof "The Killer Cars." This is a movie all Python fans should see, and one Python neophytes should use as an introduction.
Yes, some are quite silly, but they know they are! Superb animations!5/10

Do we really have to grade this among the other Pythons films, as best, worst or anything? Personally I don't feel like to. It's surely not my best, but its got some fine characteristics. It's pure early Pythons.

Actually it's no film, it's a non-stop trip of absurd humour, featuring shorts, lots of animations, silly commentary, politically incorrect, 100% English jokes, some of which are REALLY silly - the difference here is that we have a commentary within the film which blames of the film which really has taken a wrong turn and has become quite silly. Self parody, originality and sarcasm. And embarrassment, of course!

About the animations: Python animations (made by the masterman Terry Gilliam) are awesome. No insult here, I really enjoyed the film, even the silliest bits, but the animations are so good that they're the best in this one, as far as I am concerned. So the animations are mixed and edited within managing to create a genuine Python style.

Those not familiar with Pythons, I recommend to start over with LIFE OF BRYAN or HOLY GRAIL. Actually its quite 'difficult' humour but give it a try if you like something different!
Strictly for Python neophytes8/10

To most hardcore Python fans, this film will be irrellevant, as they probably have every single sketch on DVD already, and this is essentially a
"greatest hits album."

So I am going to direct this review at those who have never heard of Python before.

The film opens with a sketch called "How not to be seen," during which the narrator shoots several people in cold blood, blows people up, and then finally breaks down into hysterical laughter when he bombs a children's hospital.

This sketch is hillariously, gut bustingly funny. Why? That is the great mystery of Python. Is it the impeccable timing, the wonderful acting, or the peerless gags? Could be. But I think it is more the brilliant sense of anarchy and loony logic that makes them so brilliant. It was, after all, those people's own bloody fault they were shot; they could be seen!

Beyond this, there are the sketches that are so well known they have become cliches: the Dead Parrot sketch ("Listen mate, this parrot is dead! It's a stiff! Bereft of life it rests in peace; if you hadn't nailed it to the perch it would be pushing up the daisies! This is an ex-parrot!") the Lumberjack Song ("I chop down trees, I wear high heels suspenders and a bra!/I wish I'd been a girlie, just like my dear Mama!"), the Dirty Fork sketch ("A dirty, ugly smelly piece of cultlery!!") and so on.


There is still no substitute for watching the show. Indeed many of their best sketches aren't on here; the Cheese sketch, the Adventure Holiday sketch, and my personal favourite, the Eric the Fish sketch ("Why should I
be TARRED with the epithet "loony" simply because I have a pet 'alibut?"). Still this is a fairly safe introduction to their unique (That's putting it mildly) brand of humour.
Very good introduction to the insane world of Monty Python5/10

Produced in 1971 on a shoestring budget with the aim of breaking the Python team in the States (which eventually happened when the TV series began running on PBS), this film consists of classic moments from the first two series of Monty Python's Flying Circus, lovingly reprised, and in some cases improved upon. The 'Vocational Guidance Counsellor' sketch with Michael Palin's chartered accountant who wants to be a lion tamer is certainly better than the TV version, as is the bank robber in a lingerie shop sketch, which is performed here in such a dry, straight-faced, understated way, it makes me laugh every time. There are lots of other classics to enjoy - the dirty fork, Hell's Grannies, the Upper Class Twit of the Year show, Blackmail, camp square-bashing, the Killer Cars...if you can look past the obviously low budget (the sound mix makes some scenes sound as if they were recorded in a cake tin), you'll find one of the most tirelessly inventive sketch comedies of all time. And remember, it's NOT pining, it's passed on!