Push (2009)

Action, Sci-Fi, Thriller
Camilla Belle, Dakota Fanning, Chris Evans, Colin Ford
Two young Americans with special abilities must race to find a girl in Hong Kong before a shadowy government organization called Division does.
The sci-fi thriller Push is visually flashy but hyperkinetic and convoluted.
  • Summit Entertainment Company:
  • PG-13 Rated:
  • IMDB link IMDB:
  • 06 Feb 2009 Released:
  • 07 Jul 2009 DVD Release:
  • $31.7M Box office:

All subtitles:

Trailer:

Best of the recent movies in this new sci-fi sub-genre8/10
"Push" is the best movie from a recent new genre of science fiction movies. This new genre of movies, which includes "Jumper" and "Wanted", generally involves characters with psychic or psionic abilities, a conspiratorial shadow group, and an unlikely anti-hero, set against a banal or dystopian realism. "Push" blows these other two admittedly weak offerings out of the cinematic water.

Both the visuals and the action in "Push" are quite good. "Push" is set in Hong-Kong. The city has enough exotic flavor to be interesting and enough grit to provide a realistic backdrop for the more fanciful elements of the film. The filmmakers captured the feeling of a William Gibson novel without having to set the film at night in the rain for the entire movie.

The action sequences are excellent. "Push" does not suffer from the hyper-kinetic, shake-the-camera-until-the-viewer-is-confused action sequences of "Bourne Ultimatum" or "Quantum of Solace". In "Push", you know who is punching whom and you can tell who is winning.

Visual effects? Here is what sold me on this film and on this filmmaker's vision: When a "mover" (a person with telekinetic powers) uses his ability to push something away or to enhance the power of a punch (yes, I said TK-enhanced fight sequences...don't drool on your keyboard) the visual effects people were smart enough to consider the effect on the nearby air. The air gets...crimped, and as a result the light refracts in a split second rainbow pattern at the moment of impact. That level of forethought and detail is what "Jumper" and "Wanted" lacked.

Another element that this movie possesses that "Jumper" and "Wanted" doesn't is a focus on the characters. Any movie or show about psychic powers or "superpowers" lives or dies on the relationships between the characters. The male lead and Dakota Fanning are excellent together and quickly establish a rapport that gives the film more depth. Honorable mention goes to the enemy "watcher"--she is genuinely threatening, lollipop notwithstanding. I also loved the tip of the hat to the anime genre exhibited in Cassie's (Fanning) wardrobe.

This movie is worth every bit of the matinee price I paid. And I will probably watch it again.

A few points: One, this is not a superhero movie. While people who like "Heroes" and some of the Marvel films might enjoy this movie, one should not go in expecting that kind of experience.

Two, I do wish that the producers had about 15 million extra dollars. The extra money would have allowed them to show more of the story and neatly tie a couple of loose ends, rather than telling the audience. I sincerely hope this film does well enough to garner a more expansively budgeted sequel.

Three, this movie has some minor plot issues, especially a small deux ex machina cum Toyota, that might bother some. But, if you choose to buy into the experience, "Push" will take you on a fantastic ride.

-Blindcurve
Let yourself be Pushed.8/10
I don't see why this movie has been turned down by so many people or why such a bad word has been spread about it.

Push is one of the better modern superhuman-themed movies you will find. It won't be your top five of the year and you won't watch it a million times, but you should really like it. It won't blow you away, but it won't disappoint you.

I give my opinion on this movie not as a fully fledged movie expert, fully up-to- date, premier-going, Oscar-loving critic - but as an artistically natured, deep- rooted film lover. And I say this movie is worth watching. It has a bit of everything that is to be desired in a good movie. While a lot could've been different, and you could've improved it in many ways, it's still fine just as it is.

The story in this movie is excellent. How it is portrayed and told is great. The actors all fulfill their role, some with splendor. And no matter what anyone might have told you; this movie is greatly artistical.

I believe Push is quite unique in many ways, foremost for its unusual lack of hierarchy of the powers you see in the film. You're used to see a lot of people possessing powers, but only one of them - Magneto for instance - being the one standing above all else. But in Push no one is the obvious stronger one.

Push uses a lot of twists, and not in the first-Saw-movie way which blows you out of your seat, but it still manages to keep the movie interesting, even tough the twists are all quite predictable.

Push is also, as I said, greatly artistical. It has a lot of fantastic colors and utilizes lighting very well, it's set in very beautiful environments, and there are a lot of other great cinematic techniques being used. I especially like the choice of soundtrack in this movie. It reminds me a lot of the way they choose to use music in The Dark Knight. Instead of some really catchy, noticeable soundtrack there's been a very diligent work done with a subtle yet powerful soundtrack that emerges only when necessary and gives an indescribable force to the movie.

All in all, Push is a quite non-mainstream, entertaining, good movie worth watching.
Needs tidying up, but it's still good.9/10
PUSH is one of those movies which really got me excited after the first viewing of the trailer, and now that I've finally watched it, I'm glad that I did.

The storyline was rather good and believable, didn't leave me confused or bored at the end. Although more time could have been spent explaining certain things in detail instead of the constant scenes of standing around and pondering the next move.

The visual effects in this film are pretty good. And the acting isn't too bad either. Applause for Dakota Fanning and Chris Evans. Also, I really enjoyed the way the movie was shot, there was somehow this sense of realism to the whole thing.

However, I didn't enjoy Camilla Belle's acting. Although I did enjoy her performance in The Quiet, she just seemed really off in this movie. Either she wasn't given enough screen time, or she was outshone by Dakota.

By the way, those who are comparing this show to HEROES are preposterous. Telekineseis and all of these special abilities have been around long before then! Though I am a huge fan of HEROES, I think it's really nothing in comparison to PUSH.

By the way, this show had me glued to the sit even when I really had to use the toilet. In other words, I hope there's a sequel.
Ignore the critics, good film8/10
I was really surprised by how entertained I was by this. There were many negative reviews of this film and after watching the film I realised how many critics are actually quite lazy. They derided the plot as convoluted but actually I found it complex but understandable. To dismiss it as a heroes knock-off is also unfair. It's a sci-fi film but that doesn't mean all sci-fi films are the same. The film makes good use of its Hong Kong location more so than any recent film I've seen and the characters were memorable. The special effects were there for the story and not the other way around. I usually read film reviews but am glad, in this instance, I ignored them.
Adding Hong Kong grit to the superhero film genre9/10
While there have been superhero genre films, there is something about the way that Push takes you through the back alleys, fish markets and pint-sized hotel rooms of Hong Kong that sets it apart and makes it palpably exciting. It is exotic, but this is no fantasy world, it is a dirty reality that the characters inhabit.

Fitting perfectly with this is the lack of a clear hierarchy of super powers. In most superhero films, there are clear levels of powers, and you know exactly which characters should be stronger than others, but Push has a perfectly muddied picture – we're on the edge of our seats, because we don't know who should win. It feels oddly realistic.

Chris Evans rises to the occasion as usual as the semi-powerful protagonist, Nick, mixing in his trademark cocky funny attitude with a subtle melancholy outlook. Dakota Fanning is definitely growing up, and she is highly likable as the adolescent future teller. Camilla Belle is gorgeous, and Djimon Hounsou is as intimidating as ever as the primary villain.

It's weird to see people compare this to Jumper, because while Jumper was filled with cheap tricks, Push has you talking about the movie when you leave theaters, and thinking about its concept long after. I really like the universe it created, so I really hope we'll get to see it again with a sequel!